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News and events

 

Jul 2018: Magnus presented our work through invited and contributed talks at META 2018, Marseille.

 

Jun 2018: Our article selected for the inside cover of Advanced Optical Materials.

 

Jun 2018: We congratulations Hugo Ekinge who did a project in the group and now graduated from high school.

 

Jun 2018: We congratulate our new doctor, Elina Mitraka (co-student of Magnus).

 

May 2018: Magnus selected to be the vice chair of the Young Academy of Sweden for the coming academic year.

 

May 2018: Canyan's paper on organic fuel cells with forest fuels published in Advanced Sustainable Systems.

 

Apr 2018: We welcome Dr. Sampath Gamage and Dr. Ravi Shanker as new postdocs in the group!

 

Mar 2018: Mina's paper on hybrid plasmonics and pyroelectrics published in Advanced Optical Materials. See publications for various news stories about the study.

 

More news

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Our research in brief

 

Things change at the nanoscale! New phenomena arise, making nanoscale objects behave differently than macroscale objects. These new phenomena can be used in a plethora of novel applications and devices, which explains the great hope in nano to provide entirely new technologies rather than only a way to make things smaller.

 

An excellent example of a nanophysical phenomenon is the colour of gold nanoparticles. In contrast to large gold objects, gold nanoparticles are red and shiny. This is due an extraordinary strong interaction between light and metallic nanostructures. Light of certain colours is scattered and absorbed by the structure through excitation of collective oscillations of the metal electrons. These oscillations are called plasmons or nanoplasmons. Apart from being shiny, plasmonic structures can be used to manipulate light at the nanoscale, to form highly intense hot spots with strong electromagnetic fields or as nanoscale heat source.

 

In our research we utilize unique optical properties of plasmonic metal nanostructures in conceptually new applications. In particular, we explore hybrid plasmonic devices based on electrically and ionically conducting polymers. By in this way bridging the fields of nanoplasmonics and organic electronics, we aim to provide novel energy harvesting concepts like, solar water splitting and thermoelectrics. Moreover, we have contributed significantly to the field of plasmonic (bio) sensing and, more recently, by the development of the plasmonic nanopore for single-molecule DNA analysis.

 

Related areas that we are interested in include nanofabrication, organic electronic devices, artificial cell membranes, photoconductive materials, and nanofluidics.

 

For more detailed information about our research please see our papers, the web page of our Laboratory of Organic Electronics, or contact Magnus or any of the group members.

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