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News and events

 

Apr 2019: Thermodiffusion-assisted pyroelectrics, new route towards heat sensing for electronic skin, accepted in Advanced Functional Materials.

 

Mar 2019: Ultra wide range ellipsometry shed light on the optical conductivity of conducting polymers, published in JMMC and selected for inside cover.

 

Mar 2019: Tuneable ionic thermoelectrics, published in Nature Communications.

 

Feb 2019: Greyscale and paper electrochromic displays by UV patterning, published in Polymers and selected for the cover.

 

Jan 2019: Review on plasmonic displays out in Reports on Progress in Physics.

 

Jan 2019: Review on conducting polymers out in Advanced Materials in special issue celebrating Prof. Olle Inganäs.

 

Oct 2018: Our paper on strong coupling with nanoholes selected for supplementary cover of ACS Photonics.

 

Oct 2018: Magnus on Swedish television discussing this years Nobel Prize in Physics.

 

More news

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Our research in brief

 

Things change at the nanoscale! New phenomena arise, making nanoscale objects behave differently than macroscale objects. These new phenomena can be used in a plethora of novel applications and devices, which explains the great hope in nanoscience to provide entirely new technologies rather than only a way to make things smaller.

 

The colour of gold nanoparticles forms an excellent example of a nanophysical phenomenon. In contrast to large gold objects, gold nanoparticles are red and shiny. This is due an extraordinary strong interaction between light and metallic nanostructures. Light of certain colours is scattered and absorbed by the structure through excitation of collective electron oscillations, known as plasmons. Through plasmonic excitations, these structures offer means to manipulate light at the nanoscale. They can focus light to nanoscale hot spots or act as light-triggered nanoscale heat sources.

 

In our research we utilize unique optical properties of plasmonic metal nanostructures in conceptually new applications. In particular, we explore hybrid plasmonic devices where we combine plasmonic systems with different organic thin films., such as conducting polymers. By bridging the fields of nanoplasmonics and organic electronics, we aim to provide novel concepts for energy harvesting, sensing and displays. Related areas of interest include nanofabrication, organic electronic devices, photoconductive materials, and thermoelectrics.

 

For more detailed information about our research please see our publications, the university group home page, or contact Magnus directly.

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